Accessibility

The Dayton Art Institute is committed to reducing barriers and ensuring that the museum is welcoming and accessible to all who enter its doors. Staff and volunteers at the Guest Services Desk are available to answer specific questions about your visit to the museum.

The museum provides wheelchairs free of charge, located in the coat room off of the Rotunda entrance; these are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Elevators are available for use throughout the museum for guests who need to avoid stairs. Recent updates to the museum funded by a State of Ohio Capital Appropriations Bill have converted all of our restrooms to be Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant and helped make other accessibility improvements throughout our historic building.

If you have any questions or need additional assistance, contact the museum at 937-223-4ART (4278) or by email at info@daytonart.org.

Parking

There are four (4) handicapped parking spaces in the museum parking: two (2) on the south side of the Entrance Rotunda and two (2) in front of the Rike Pavilion.

Hearing Loop System: Mimi and Stuart Rose Auditorium

As part of its ongoing efforts to make the museum accessible to everyone, the Dayton Art Institute recently partnered with Hillcrest Hearing, the audiology division of Southwest Ohio ENT, to install a hearing loop system in the Mimi and Stuart Rose Auditorium.

What is a hearing loop?

A hearing loop is to hearing aids what WiFi is to computers. Hearing Loop systems (Audio Frequency Induction Loop Systems–AFILS) have been widely used in Northern Europe for decades to extend the performance of hearing aids and are now gaining greater use in the United States. Most hearing aids and listening devices are equipped with a Telecoil or have the option available. The Telecoil is a small copper wire coiled around a rod located inside hearing aids, cochlear implants or listening devices. The Telecoil works as an “antenna” to pick up magnetic signals produced by a hearing loop system and stream them as sound into a Telecoil-equipped listening device. The Telecoil usually needs to be turned on by a hearing healthcare professional.

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